Sport for Social Change -Changing stereotypes through sport

Objective

-Increase 3,500 children knowledge in 8 primary schools through key child and gender-based violence messages.

-Support 160 grade 6 players to successfully transition to Junior Secondary school and their 160 families to establish businesses to boost family income and retain them in school.

-Support 80 adolescents’ girls with reusable sanitary pads and SRHR education to reduce teenage pregnancies STI/D’s, early marriages and combat skills to defend against rape.

 -Keep physically and mentally fitter 160 grade 6 kids, help communities identify talents through training and Football tournament.

-Increase 30 community stakeholder’s knowledge through training on Sierra Leone 2007 Gender Acts.

Deliverables

Direct Beneficiaries- 384

Indirect- 12,800+

160 in-school pupils/players (80 boys and 80 girls) in the football teams

160 parents of the 160 players benefiting from business grant

2 trainers in combat sport

80 adolescent girls receive reusable sanitary pads and training for self-defense.

30 community stakeholders trained on the Gender Act.

8 Project Staff

16 training coaches both males and females in charge of boys and girls teams in the 8 schools.

2,800 in-school pupils reached with advocacy messages during tournament and trainings.

10,000+ residents reached with advocacy messages.

4 Community Change agents

2 Commentators 

Resources provided

We Yone Child Foundation will need the sum of USD 53, 619 to fully implement this project within two slum communities in Freetown Sierra Leone.

Other resources needed are; balls, jearsy, teachers, schools, school goinng children, PA System, referees, volunteers and staff including social workers and business officers to support families.

Milestones

1

Cooperate fundraiser

We need volunteer cooperate fundraiser to share our project with sport and development companies to help us fund the project. 

 

Skills & Languages

In 1996, twelve-year-old Santigie Bayo Dumbuya was among several boys who were taken from Kamabonko Village to fight for the Revolutionary United Front during the Sierra Leone Civil War. Fighting near the Guinean border, by the age of fourteen Santigie had sustained multiple bullet and shrapnel wounds. He went to Freetown in year 2000 to recover from the war, complete his education and founded We Yone Child Foundation (WYCF) in 2009 with the vision to ensure educated children and empowered families to live in healthy, developed and integrated communities. Santigie decided to focus WYCF’s efforts on Kroo Bay and George Brook until 2019 scale up activities in three other rural communities, the appalling conditions in these communities called for action and no other organization was producing results.

WYCF strives to improve the lives of vulnerable children and their families by providing quality education and self-empowerment opportunities. We work in extremely poor slum and rural communities in Sierra Leone, running 3 primary schools delivering education to over 1,000 children, and provide scholarships for students to continue their education including community outreach initiatives focusing on child protection, female empowerment and basic health and hygiene training. School clubs and local community counselling sessions focused on teenage pregnancy, sexual violence and ending child marriage. 

Skills

Fundraising
Communications
Writing

Languages

English

Skills

Digital Marketing

Languages

About the Non-Profit

We Yone Child Foundation

Overview

WYCF strives to improve the lives of vulnerable children and their families by providing quality education and self-empowerment opportunities. We work in extremely poor slum communities in Freetown, run 3 primary schools delivering education to over 1,000 children, and provide scholarships for students. WYCF facilitates several community outreach initiatives focusing on child protection, female empowerment and basic health and hygiene training. This includes school clubs and local community counselling sessions focused on teenage pregnancy, sexual violence and child marriage. Our “Girls to Women Reusable Pads” project tackles menstruation stigma, provides girls with safe and affordable hygiene products, and facilitates training sessions for the production of reusable pads. In collaboration with the NGO Street Child, WYCF has implemented “Girls Speak Out”, a project that carries out city-wide needs assessments, distributes educational resources to girls at risk of dropping out of school, and delivers targeted livelihoods support.

Mission

To provide sustainable education and care to underpriviledged children and overcome the social and environmental problems that deepen and perpetuate the cycle of poverty.

History

In 1996, twelve-year-old Santigie Bayo Dumbuya was among several boys who were taken from Kamabonko Village to fight for the Revolutionary United Front during the Sierra Leone Civil War. Fighting near the Guinean border, by the age of fourteen Santigie had sustained multiple bullet and shrapnel wounds.

In 1999, Santigie’s unit was stationed near a team called Sanyah.

 ‘When we entered the town in the evening the heavy gunfight sounded like music, but full of death and sorrow. What I saw on that day was so terrible. Some of my close friends were killed. During the fighting I saw a female child at the age of 5-6 years old crying. I saw two people lying on the ground, one was already dead and the other is struggling to die.’ Santigie remembered his village and the person whom he was raised to be – ‘that was the day of my revolution and my heart was inspired.’  

He dropped his gun and ran through the crossfire to save the girl. With no food or water,  Santigie carried her for two days and two nights to safety. He saved her life.

Santigie never saw the girl again. He went to Freetown to recover from the war, complete his education and founded We Yone Child Foundation (WYCF) in 2009. Santigie decided to focus WYCF’s efforts on Kroo Bay and George Brook. the appalling conditions in these two communities called for action and no other organization was producing results.

‘We Yone’ means ‘our own” in the locally spoken Krio language. It is the perfect description for the way we feel about the children we work for every day.  


Project Leader
Ask A Question

Submit technical question via support form.

Support
Posted By
Application Deadline

Jun 01, 2023
VOLUNTEERS REQUIRED

1 of 5 accepted
START AND END DATE

Jul 01, 2023

Dec 31, 2023
PROJECT INFORMATION

Virtual

Fundraising
TIME REQUIREMENTS

1-5 HOURS PER WEEK
UN SDGS SUPPORTED